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Covid app chaos as record 618,903 alerts sent to Britons last week –pingdemic crisis fears | UK | News

Rishi Sunak addresses ‘frustration’ over NHS Covid App

According to figures for the week ending July 14, the app sent out 618,903 alerts across England and Wales. Of those, 607,486 were sent out to registered users in England. Such are the high numbers of workers being pinged by the app, there is concern services, supply chains and businesses may fail over the next few weeks. 

Ian Wright, chief executive of the Food and Drink Federation said up to 25 percent of staff at some businesses are self-isolating after being pined by the app. 

He told Sky News: “I think the situation is concerning and it’s up and down the supply chain.

“It’s not consistent across the country – there are some places where shops and factories are working perfectly normally and in other parts manufacturers are under extreme pressure to continue producing because they may have up to 25% of their staff off.

“This is partly as a result of structural labour shortages but increasingly the cause is pinging, and it’s getting worse, there is no question about that.”

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Covid news: A record number of people were pinged today (Image: GETTY)

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Covid news: The app reported a record number of people (Image: GETTY)

Under Government guidelines, if you are pinged by the app or contacted by NHS Test and Trace after coming into contact with someone who test positive, you must self-isolate for 10 days. 

The app will then provide a 10-day countdown for your isolation but may advise you to isolate for longer although this is only advisory.

It is advised to apply for a rapid flow test or PCR test if you develop symptoms. 

Crucially, however, if pinged by the app after coming into contact with s positive contact, you are not legally required to self-isolate. 

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Covid news: The app will then count down your isolation (Image: GETTY)

A No 10 spokesperson, however, advised the public to listen to the advice from NHS app.

They said this week: “Isolation remains the most important action people can take to stop the spread of the virus.

“Given the risk of having and spreading the virus when people have been in contact with someone with Covid it is crucial people isolate when they are told to do so, either by NHS Test and Trace or by the NHS covid app.

“Businesses should be supporting employees to isolate, they should not be encouraging them to break isolation.”

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Covid news: Commueters returned to work on July 19 (Image: GETTY)

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Covid news: The public has been encouraged to receive a vaccine (Image: GETTY)

From August 16, those who have been fully vaccinated will be exempt from self-isolation. 

Instead, you will be advised to take a PCR test as soon as possible. 

Under-18s are also exempt from self-isolating from August 16.

Despite some of these exemptions, MPs have become worried over the vast amount of people now self-isolating. 

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Covid news: Vaccine numbers as of July 21 (Image: Express)

As well as today’s latest figures, 530,125 adults were contacted by the app in the week ending July 7. 

While no list for exemptions from self-isolation have been drawn up, employers can apply to Government departments to avoid having to do so. 

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Covid news: Boris Johnson has been pressured to draw up an exemption list (Image: GETTY)

On Monday, the Prime Minister did announce critical care workers who have been fully vaccinated for at least two weeks, are exempt from self-isolating if contacted by the app. 

As of July 21, the UK reported 44,104 cases, 73 deaths and 747 hospital admittances. 





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