NBA: Kyrie Irving posts links to movie ‘containing anti-Semitic disinformation’


NBA star Kyrie Irving shared a link to a movie and book ‘containing anti-Semitic disinformation’ on his Twitter and Instagram profiles.

The Brooklyn Nets point guard caught the attention for publicizing the 2018 film ‘Hebrews to Negroes: Wake Up Black America’ on social media with a link to its Amazon page.

Magazine Rolling Stone has labeled the movie and the book with the same name, released in 2015, as ‘venomously anti-Semitic’.

The publication pointed out that the book by Ronald Dalton Jr. comments on ‘many famous high-ranking Jews’ have ‘admitted to ‘worship[ing] Satan or Lucifer.’

The Nets distanced themselves from Irving’s posts in a statement to the New York Post, condemning hate speech while not commenting on their player’s actions.

‘The Brooklyn Nets strongly condemn and have no tolerance for the promotion of any form of hate speech,’ the statement read.

NBA star Kyrie Irving shared links to a movie and book ‘containing anti-Semitic disinformation’

The Brooklyn Nets point guard caught the attention for publicizing the 2018 film 'Hebrews to Negroes: Wake Up Black America' on social media with a link to its Amazon page

The Brooklyn Nets point guard caught the attention for publicizing the 2018 film ‘Hebrews to Negroes: Wake Up Black America’ on social media with a link to its Amazon page

‘We believe that in these situations, our first action must be open, honest dialogue.

‘We thank those, including the ADL [Anti-Defamation League], who have been supportive during this time.’ 

Dailymail.com has reached out to the Nets for comment. 

Irving, who was in action in the Nets’ 129-125 loss to the Dallas Mavericks on Thursday, has 4.5million followers on Twitter plus 17.5million on his Instagram profile.

The 30-year-old raised eyebrows last month for sharing a video by conspiracy theorist Alex Jones from 2002 to his Instagram story. 

The video, entitled ‘Never Forget – Alex Jones Tried To Warn Us,’ refers to a ‘New World Order’ that would ‘release plagues’. 

In the video Jones said: ‘Yes there have been corrupt empires. Yes they manipulate. Yes there are secret societies. Yes there have been oligarchies throughout history. 

Irving shared a video by conspiracy theorist Alex Jones from 2002 to his Instagram story last month. The 20-year-old video, entitled 'Never Forget - Alex Jones Tried To Warn Us,' refers to a 'New World Order' that would 'release plagues'

Irving shared a video by conspiracy theorist Alex Jones from 2002 to his Instagram story last month. The 20-year-old video, entitled ‘Never Forget – Alex Jones Tried To Warn Us,’ refers to a ‘New World Order’ that would ‘release plagues’

‘And yes, today in 2002, there is a tyrannical organization calling itself the New World Order… by releasing diseases and viruses and plagues upon us, we then basically get shoved into their system.’

The 2002 clip of Jones – ordered to pay nearly $1billion to the families of the victims of the Sandy Hook mass shooting – was one of several videos shared to Irving’s story at the time.

Irving, who serves as vice president on the player’s association’s executive committee, posted videos which discussed a range of topics, including ‘the saturation of the media with celebratory posts about the late Queen Elizabeth II’ and decolonization. 

Irving is no stranger to conspiracies having long been willing to embrace theories such as the earth being flat or that the moon landing was staged. 

Irving featured for the Brooklyn Nets in their 129-125 loss to the Dallas Mavericks on Thursday

Irving featured for the Brooklyn Nets in their 129-125 loss to the Dallas Mavericks on Thursday

The unvaccinated basketball star was unable to play in most of Brooklyn’s home games last season because he did not meet a New York City vaccine mandate for workplaces. 

In October 2021, he started following and liking Instagram posts from a conspiracy theorist who claimed that ‘secret societies’ are implanting vaccines in a plot to connect black people to a master computer for ‘a plan of Satan.’

In apologizing for his endorsement of the Flat Earth ‘theory’ back in October 2018, Irving admitted to being a conspiracy theorist. 

‘I was definitely at that time, ”I’m a big conspiracy theorist. You can’t tell me anything.” I’m sorry about all that,’ Irving said. 

‘Even if you believe in that, don’t come out and say that stuff. That’s for intimate conversations because perception and how you’re received, it changes. I’m actually a smart-ass individual,’ he explained, 18 months after he first told an interviewer that ‘The Earth is flat. The Earth is flat. … It’s right in front of our faces.’