Soccer broadcaster Lucy Zelic says A-League ‘sold their soul’ for hated Sydney grand final switch


Fiery soccer broadcaster Lucy Zelic says the A-League ‘sold their soul’ with ‘turd’ of a decision to sell the grand final to Sydney for three years in $10million deal that has left fans outraged

  • Former SBS presenter Lucy Zelic has called out ‘turd’ decision from A-League
  • Sydney will host next three men’s & women’s Grand Finals, deal with NSW Govt
  • A fired Zelic said A-League ‘sold their soul’, labelled development ‘despicable’
  • Scores of supporters are enraged, players such as Craig Goodwin also unhappy 
  • Melbourne fans have threatened to walk out of Saturday’s derby as a protest 

Outspoken soccer broadcaster Lucy Zelic has blasted the A-League, stating they have ‘sold their soul’ after making a ‘turd’ of a decision to sell grand final hosting rights to the NSW Government for more than $10million.

Zelic, 36, didn’t mince her words following the announcement from Australian Professional Leagues (APL) boss Danny Townsend on Monday.

The agreement will be in place for the next three seasons. 

Previously, A-League men’s and women’s clubs who excelled in their respective finals series won the right to host deciders. 

‘They [the A-League] sold their soul,’ Zelic said on SEN’s The Run Home. ‘There is nothing great about this decision.

‘The A-Leagues can dress this pig up as much as they like and they can call this turd whatever they want, it’s still a turd.’

Broadcaster Lucy Zelic has blasted the A-League, stating they have ‘sold their soul’ by taking $10million from the NSW Government so Sydney holds the competition’s men’s and women’s grand finals until 2025

Fans from Adelaide United and Brisbane (both teams pictured) will have to fork out for flights and accommodation to see the grand final in Sydney for at least the next three years if their teams are in the decider

Fans from Adelaide United and Brisbane (both teams pictured) will have to fork out for flights and accommodation to see the grand final in Sydney for at least the next three years if their teams are in the decider

A blunt Zelic went onto label the development ‘disgusting, despicable and disgraceful’ and felt it was ‘a slap in the face to football fans who have genuinely stood by their teams for many years’.

She then pointed to a scenario where Melbourne Victory and Melbourne City could progress to a men’s or women’s decider in the Harbour City.

Supporters would need to fork out for flights, accommodation in addition to grand final tickets.

Zelic also felt Sydney-based fans wouldn’t be interested in watching two interstate teams battle for the silverware. 

The former SBS presenter wasn’t finished, declaring on Monday that board members from A-League men’s and women’s clubs should be held accountable for the decision as they continue to ‘line their coffers’.

Zelic also pointed to the rising cost of living as she outlined why the decision will result in more supporters abandoning the game in Australia

Zelic also pointed to the rising cost of living as she outlined why the decision will result in more supporters abandoning the game in Australia

An all-Sydney A-League grand final (both teams pictured) would be a promoter's dream - but selling a decider in the Harbour City between two interstate teams won't be easy for a competition already struggling with low crowd numbers

An all-Sydney A-League grand final (both teams pictured) would be a promoter’s dream – but selling a decider in the Harbour City between two interstate teams won’t be easy for a competition already struggling with low crowd numbers

On Tuesday morning Zelic tweeted the A-League has already attempted to ‘Australian-ise’ football in this country since the demise of the NSL, before pondering what the next move will be from officials.

Townsend confirmed the decision was made in consultation with all A-League men’s and women’s clubs.

In his eyes, it was vital to establish a new tradition, which after 18 years needed revamping if it was to stay relevant.

‘Change is difficult, the initial reaction (from fans) is always going to be emotional,’ he said.

‘We hope and think in the fullness of time we will look back at this moment and people will be grateful that we had the confidence to make this decision.’